Monday, 16 December 2019, 02:43 AM

Site: Webmaster Technology Institute
Course: Webmaster Technology Institute (AWS)
Glossary: Global Technical Glossary

B

:
Also known as: Bit Error Ratio, Bit Error Rate Bit Error Rate or Bit Error Ratio (BER) is a measure of the accuracy of transmission for digital information in a telecommunications system. The BER is calculated as the number of bits that were in error, as a proportion of the total number of bits transmitted, or received, or processed over a given period of time. This figure can be used to indicate the Quality of Service for a service provider, and is typically of the order of one error bit in a billion (or 1 in 10 to the power minus 9).
:
Also known as: Bit Error Rate Test Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) is a device or test used to determine the Bit Error Rate for a particular transmission. The test is used to discover how many received bits of data were in error, as a ratio of the total number of bits received. The result is usually a very small number, typically one in a billion (or 10 to the power minus 9).
:
n. signboard, usually outdoors, for advertising posters
:
Also known as: Bit Bit (binary digit) is the smallest unit of data used in digital information systems, being allocated only a single value of either 0 or 1, i.e. an "off" or an "on" state. In the data communication field bits are counted using the decimal number system, and so other units of bits are kilobit (1,000 bits), Megabit (1,000,000 bits) and Gigabit (1,000,000,000 bits). The term "Bit" is derived from a combination of b(inary) and (dig)it
:
basic input output system
:
binary digit
:

A bitmap graphic, is a data file or structure representing a generally rectangular grid of pixels, or points of color, on a computer monitor, paper, or other display device. The color of each pixel is individually defined; images in the RGB color space, for instance, often consist of colored pixels defined by three bytesone byte each for red, green and blue. Less colorful images require less information per pixel; an image with only black and white pixels requires only a single bit for each pixel. Raster graphics are distinguished from vector graphics in that vector graphics represent an image through the use of geometric objects such as curves and polygons.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitmap_graphics

:

A bit map (often spelled "bitmap") defines a display space and the color for each pixel or "bit" in the display space. A Graphics Interchange Format and a JPEG are examples of graphic image file types that contain bit maps.

url

:
Also known as: bps Bits per Second (bps) is a commonly used unit of measurement in telecommunications for the rate or speed at which data is transferred. The bps indicates how many binary digits (the number of 0's and 1's) are transmitted or received in a serial form (one bit after another) each second. In practice larger units are more convenient: one kilobit per second (kbps) is equal to 1,000 bps, one Megabit per second (Mbps) is equal to 1,000,000 bps or 1,000 kbps, one Gigabit per second (Gbps) is equal to 1,000,000,000 bps or 1,000 Mbps. The bps is also an indication of a signal's bandwidth, and usually the higher the bps the greater is the signal bandwidth (a frequency measured in kHz or MHz). The old measure of data speed was the Baud or "baud rate", which is the number of times a digital signal changes state each second. For a given digital signal Baud rate is almost always a lower figure than bps, but Baud Rate and bps are often wrongly interchanged
:
web log
:
bits per second
:
Sometimes referred to as a high-speed internet, broadband is an ‘always on’ fast connection to the internet. Today there are a wide variety of broadband technologies available in most areas; two of the more commonly found and used technologies are cable and DSL broadband.
:

Browsers are software programs that allow you to navigate the World Wide Web.

:
Busy transfer is a phone feature similar to call divert, except that the call is only re-directed if the receiving phone is engaged
:
Also known as: B Byte (B) is the name given to a group of 8 bits of digital data that are read as a single unit or word. Each byte can represent information that is used in a system, such as a single character from the ASCII code. The number of bytes is also commonly used as a measure to indicate information capacity, and the storage of data in digital systems is normally quoted in megabytes or gigabytes. In computer systems bytes are always used to refer to the memory and disk space, as computers deal easily with binary numbers (i.e. powers of 2). The size of text and image files is also normally given in bytes (e.g. in kilobytes or megabytes). In contrast, communication systems tend to use bits when referring to data transmission speeds. Although there are usually eight bits in a byte, longer sequences such as 16 and 32 bits are also possible

C

:
computer aided design
:

Call barring is a mobile phone feature that allows the user to set certain prohibitions on incoming or outgoing calls. This is an effective means to prevent the phone being used to make expensive international or premium rate calls, particularly when the phone is to be used by people other than the subscriber.

Many companies that provide for business use now employ call barring as a security measure, to control their use and restrict calls to pre-approved numbers. The user's personal code must be used to activate this feature

:

Call deflection is a selective call divert that allows a call to be forwarded without accepting it. Call deflection can either be invoked automatically by the mobile station, or by a network interaction. It is only supported within an ISDN call environment, and will only work as long as no call forwarding or divert limits have been met. Calls can be deflected to different numbers depending on the caller’s number, discovered by CLIP.
:

Call divert is a�handset feature that allows the user to forward or redirect all incoming calls to an alternate�number (fixed or mobile), or to voicemail. This is a facility with many advantages, enabling the user to be called on another phone or at a particular location, to have calls answered by somebody else, or to use a voicemail answering service. When this feature is activated the�number from which calls are forwarded will not ring or receive calls. Various options may be available to the user, allowing them to choose different phone numbers to divert to, depending on the circumstances. For example, calls may be diverted to one number when engaged (busy transfer), but another number or voicemail when the phone is switched off or the network unavailable.
:

Call holding is a phone feature that allows the user to put an ongoing call on hold, while at the same time making or receiving a second call on the same phone.

The person 'on hold' will not be aware of what the other party is doing during the call holding period, and they may be presented with silence or hear pre-recorded music and reassuring messages. This feature is convenient when a user needs to talk with two parties who should not talk directly (i.e. a conference call is not possible), which might arise when a mortgage broker is setting up a deal between a bank and a mortgager.

Call holding can also be used in conjunction with call waiting to allow two calls to be handled at once, so ensuring that important incoming calls are not missed.