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Also known as: Java 2 Platform, Java Micro Edition, K Java J2ME (Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition or K Java) is a software and technology environment that has been specifically designed to enable the development of applications optimised for use on mobile and portable consumer devices, such as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). J2ME is able to run on devices with RAM of only 128 kB, and this allows programmers to use the Java programming language (and related tools) to develop software for devices with limited memory. A wide range of applications and games are now available for use on mobile devices. J2ME was developed by Sun Microsystems
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Java is an object oriented language created by Sun Microsystems in the mid-nineties to provide an open and machine independant platform to develop applications on. The original driving force behind Java was the need to write application code for web applications that could be downloaded via a browser and then executed on a client, regardless of its operating system, be it Windows, Mac, Unix, Symbian or anything else. Java has since grown extensively as more uses have been found for such a versatile language and more platforms have been brought into existence. Thousands of different constructs (for example "collections" and "frameworks") have been created and built into the Java language itself, making the language extremely adaptable. Java has even been used to write entire operating systems. The key part of Java that allows it to be run on on such a diverse range of hardware and operating systems is the JVM, or Java Virtual Machine. This is in effect a program that acts as a virtual computer which can understand Java; Java programs are then run on this virtual machine. Java tends to occur in the mobile telecommunications industry in two common forms - J2ME (Java 2 Micro Edition), which is the set of Java objects and interfaces available on mobile platforms such as phones; and downloadable Java applications (most commonly Java games) which are developed by software houses and then installable over the air by any handset user. The definitive resource on Java is at java.sun.com
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Also known as: J2ME, Java Micro Edition, K Java J2ME (Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition or K Java) is a software and technology environment that has been specifically designed to enable the development of applications optimised for use on mobile and portable consumer devices, such as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). J2ME is able to run on devices with RAM of only 128 kB, and this allows programmers to use the Java programming language (and related tools) to develop software for devices with limited memory. A wide range of applications and games are now available for use on mobile devices. J2ME was developed by Sun Microsystems
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Java Games are simple arcade style games, written in the Java language, that are designed to run on a mobile phone. A phone that supports Java applications will be able to run Java games, and these may be downloaded easily and quickly from a number of web sites, usually for a fee, although some sites provide Free Online Games. The games are stored in the internal memory of the phone
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J2ME (Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition or K Java) is a software and technology environment that has been specifically designed to enable the development of applications optimised for use on mobile and portable consumer devices, such as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). J2ME is able to run on devices with RAM of only 128 kB, and this allows programmers to use the Java programming language (and related tools) to develop software for devices with limited memory. A wide range of applications and games are now available for use on mobile devices. J2ME was developed by Sun Microsystems
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Also known as: JPEG JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) is an independant organisation formed in the mid eighties with the aim of creating true colour computer image standards. The initiative to develop a photographic image format was initially taken on by the ISO but other groups were merged (including the ITU-T) in order to take advantage of their experience. The standard most commonly referred to by the term JPEG is ISO/IEC IS 10918-1, which defines techniques for digitally coding photographic images. There is an extension of this standard called JFIF (JPEG File Interchange Format) which is the standard commonly used for almost all JPEG image files. JPEG can be used to store either truecolour (24-bit) or greyscale images. It uses a lossy compression algorithm called DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform) which is a lot more complex than normal bitmap encodings and so requires more computing power to encode or decode; the benefit is that good image quality can be acheived with a small file. DCT in JPEGs works best on photographic images; graphics that contain sharp contrasts such as straight edges don´┐Ż??t compress so well. Being a lossy compression method, it is possible to have manual control over the balanace between the quality and file size of JPEG-coded images. There has been demand for JPEG images that employ lossless compression as the basic standard does not define it very clearly or thoroughly. The JPEG-LS standard (ISO/IEC IS 14495-1) has been developed by the Joint Photographic Experts Group to help increase the quality and integration of lossless compression. The JPEG standard is heavily supported by the open source movement, and the good accessibility of JPEG coding and decoding packages has helped its rapid adoption into the mainstream in the mid nineties.
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A device connected to a computer to control actions on a screen, e.g. in computer games. Can have a similar function to a mouse.
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joint photographic experts group
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